From June 2016

Of Hallows and Horcruxes

I wrote a while back about my eldest being a big Harry Potter fan, and that I’d found a fantastic pattern for the sweater Hermione wears in Deathly Hallows Part I… the post is here, if you want to refresh your memory. I bought the recommended yarn from Knit Picks and it sat for a couple of months, until I decided it was time to knit the sweater.

This sweater was certainly an adventure. First of all, to be fair, the designer, while she has several patterns on Ravelry, only has the one garment pattern. Of her 13 patterns, 10 are crochet patterns. This should have been a warning that this wasn’t going to be smooth sailing. I was smart, and went through other projects and read the notes, and felt an impending sense of doom. So many comments about things that were wrong, or needed to be modified! It was discouraging, and I hadn’t even cast on yet! I’m not so easily dissuaded though. I did my gauge swatch, measured the kid, and started knitting. I figured I’d use the experience of other knitters who’d already made one to make the process easier.

Problem 1: The yoke is designed badly. The original sweater from the movie was apparently purchased at H&M, and is seamed, rather than having a yoke. Knitting in one piece is easier though, so I can see why the designer chose to make it this way. Also, nobody is going to tell you that you’re sweater is wrong because it is a yoke rather than being seamed.

The problem here is that the increases are weird the way they’re written, which skews the colourwork pattern. Many knitters who have made this cardigan used Elizabeth Zimmerman’s method. This preserved the colourwork pattern.

Problem 2: The yarn requirements were way off. I’d only knitted the hood and had not quite finished the body, and only had 2.5 balls of yarn left. I knew there was no way I would be able to knit pockets and two sleeves with that much yarn, so I had to hunt for more, because Knit Picks was sold out. I eventually found someone who was destashing two skeins.

Problem 3: Lots of people complained that the sleeves were too big. I had to decrease them considerably. I also chose to knit them in the round, inside out, because I didn’t want to have to seam them and I also didn’t fancy purling them.

DSC_4837 The sweater, in the end, turned out nicely, and the kid is happy with it (though it was too warm to wear by the time it was finished). I did have a request for another one from my best friend, but I told her I’d never knit this sweater again. I didn’t keep detailed notes, and didn’t want to have to fight my way through it a second time. I’d be happy to knit her something else though!

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The cabled button band was knit as the sweater was knit. The whole thing, aside from the pockets, is one piece. I had expected to have to pick up stitches, but the only picked up stitches were at the underarms.

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I do quite like the pointy hood. Hopefully the kid gets a lot of wear out of this sweater. And there’s already dibs on it if/when they decide they’re not into it anymore… My best friend wants it when the kiddo is done with it!

My Ravelry page is here.

Bonny

I wrote recently about trying to make this top using Tosh Lace, which wasn’t right for the project. I couldn’t get gauge, and didn’t like the resulting fabric on larger needles. That yarn ended up in a stole, which I blogged here.

I absolutely had to make a Bonny¬†top though. It’s versatile, and I already had the pattern, so I didn’t want it to go to waste, being that it wasn’t a free pattern. I really quite like Tin Can Knits designs too.

My husband and I were going out for the day, so we stopped at Urban Yarns in North Vancouver, and he sat on the sofa while I tried to make up my mind on what yarn I would use for my Bonny. It was a hard decision! I knew I wanted a light fingering, as the top calls for laceweight, and I hadn’t had luck getting gauge and didn’t want more laceweight in my stash if it didn’t work out. I finally decided on Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in the Oak colourway, which is a lovely bright green which reminds me of moss.

I had no trouble getting gauge with this yarn, and loved the way it knit up. It makes a lovely fabric. The only modification I made to this pattern was to do a folded hem, using a provisional cast on as described in Dramy’s Bonny. I hate rolling stockinette, and this solved the problem perfectly.

I finished the top in two weeks, however it took me another couple of weeks to finally seam the shoulders. I hate seaming, so I kept putting it off. The weather warmed up a lot too, and I didn’t anticipate wearing it any time soon, so seaming it wasn’t a priority.

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Here it is after seaming, but I really wasn’t happy with the shoulders. They stick out! I knew I would never stop being annoyed by how the shoulders look, so I played with them until I decided that gathering them a little would fix the problem.

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This is much better! I just ran some stitches across each shoulder and tightened them up a little bit until they were slightly gathered. This pulled the shoulders in, eliminating the points on the outsides of the shoulders. Of course, now it’s the middle of June, and it’s far too warm to wear my Bonny, but it’s ready for the fall!

My project page is here.

Siren Song

I got a skein of Madelinetosh Tosh Lace from another local Ravelry member, who was destashing. It was a great value, and the colours were totally my cuppa tea. The yarn itself has been discontinued, sadly. It is lovely.

The first thing I tried to make with it was a Wispy cardigan, but the laceweight was just a little too fine for my liking. I wasn’t thrilled with the fabric, so I frogged it half way through. I later tried this cardi with a heavier yarn, and ended up frogging that as well. I think this cardi just isn’t right for me.

The second attempt was a Bonny sleeveless top, but I couldn’t get gauge. I did eventually make a Bonny, with a different Madelinetosh yarn, and I love it, but that’s a post for another day.

I let the yarn sit in my stash a little while longer, until I finally stumbled upon the perfect pattern. Siren Song is lovely, and would be perfect for the green yarn with its flashes of lavender. I had more yarn than the pattern called for, so I modified it a little.

Because I was using laceweight yarn, I used size 4 needles instead of the required size 6 needles. I also knit extra repeats of the lace. The lace has three charts, all of which are easy to memorize. I unfortunately neglected to record how many repeats I did of each chart, but I know I did extra repeats of the medium and small waves. I had very little yarn left when I finished.

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My Ravelry project page is here, if you’re interested.