Tagged tin can knits

Bonny

I wrote recently about trying to make this top using Tosh Lace, which wasn’t right for the project. I couldn’t get gauge, and didn’t like the resulting fabric on larger needles. That yarn ended up in a stole, which I blogged here.

I absolutely had to make a Bonny top though. It’s versatile, and I already had the pattern, so I didn’t want it to go to waste, being that it wasn’t a free pattern. I really quite like Tin Can Knits designs too.

My husband and I were going out for the day, so we stopped at Urban Yarns in North Vancouver, and he sat on the sofa while I tried to make up my mind on what yarn I would use for my Bonny. It was a hard decision! I knew I wanted a light fingering, as the top calls for laceweight, and I hadn’t had luck getting gauge and didn’t want more laceweight in my stash if it didn’t work out. I finally decided on Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in the Oak colourway, which is a lovely bright green which reminds me of moss.

I had no trouble getting gauge with this yarn, and loved the way it knit up. It makes a lovely fabric. The only modification I made to this pattern was to do a folded hem, using a provisional cast on as described in Dramy’s Bonny. I hate rolling stockinette, and this solved the problem perfectly.

I finished the top in two weeks, however it took me another couple of weeks to finally seam the shoulders. I hate seaming, so I kept putting it off. The weather warmed up a lot too, and I didn’t anticipate wearing it any time soon, so seaming it wasn’t a priority.

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Here it is after seaming, but I really wasn’t happy with the shoulders. They stick out! I knew I would never stop being annoyed by how the shoulders look, so I played with them until I decided that gathering them a little would fix the problem.

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This is much better! I just ran some stitches across each shoulder and tightened them up a little bit until they were slightly gathered. This pulled the shoulders in, eliminating the points on the outsides of the shoulders. Of course, now it’s the middle of June, and it’s far too warm to wear my Bonny, but it’s ready for the fall!

My project page is here.

Snowflake Sweater

I don’t often post about knits that just don’t work out, but I’m going to do so today. Some time ago, I fell in love with the Snowflake sweater pattern from Tin Can Knits (they’re local, woo!) It’s a fantastic pullover, with a nice lace yoke. I never wear pullovers, because I get too hot, but ever since I saw the sample in person at Knit City, I was obsessed with it.

Back in November, Knit Picks had a too-good-to-pass-up sale on some of their yarns. Specifically, Capra, which is normally one of their most expensive yarns. It’s a soft, squishy merino cashmere blend, and has a beautiful, subtle halo after blocking. Only the tumeric colour was on sale, but since I love Autumn colours, I snapped up eight balls of it, along with the wine colour, since I decided this was the perfect yarn for the Snowflake sweater. The funny thing about my colour selection is that I accidentally picked Gryffindor colours, which is the Harry Potter house I was sorted into when I joined Pottermore. It would be my accidental Gryffindor sweater!

As soon as my yarn arrived, I swatched and started knitting. The yoke lace is a little confusing, but I found the help I needed on the Tin Can Knits forum on Ravelry, in this thread.

Once the lace was done, it was time to work out my bust shaping. I tried short row bust shaping, but the picked up wraps were incredibly ugly. Maybe a dark yarn would be okay, but on such a light colour, any imperfections show up and are obvious. I ripped back my bust shaping and tossed the sweater in time-out, until I could find a better way to accomplish my bust shaping.

I re-read Amy Herzog’s Fit to Flatter, but her instructions are typically for bottom up, seamed sweaters. It made my head hurt trying to work out the shaping on my top down, knit in the round sweater. I re-read Ysolda Teague’s Little Red in the City, and it was easier to work with, because she typically writes top down, knit in the round patterns, but I wasn’t really feeling the love on how she suggests that you work bust darts.

Off to the internet I went. Read the post from the Knitty Professors again, but it uses short row shaping as well as darts, and as I said before, I wanted to avoid that. After spending way too long searching, I came across a tutorial written by a Ravelry member named strickauszeit. In the tutorial, she discusses different methods of shaping a sweater bust, using darts, specifically in top down sweaters. Eureka! I did the math, and came up with my bust shaping. I posted the calculations on my Ravelry project page, if you’re interested.

DSC_4617Guess what? It worked like a charm.

Now for the bad news. I’ve come to accept that there’s a very good reason I don’t wear pullovers. They’re hot, and I can’t just take it off like I can if a cardigan gets too warm. We don’t want the decency police coming after me! Granted, I’d probably tell them where to go and how to get there, but that’s another topic. After all of the work I did to make the sweater work, I started having serious doubts about whether I’d ever even wear it. The more I thought about it, the more I came to accept that I wouldn’t. The sweater would sit in a drawer, with its nearly perfect bust shaping, and that would be that.

The other bad news is that I bought far too much of the wine coloured yarn, and not nearly enough of the tumeric. I could buy more, except Knit Picks is out of stock until April, which would mean that even if I did manage to wear my sweater, it wouldn’t be until October, at the earliest. The yarn would also be a different dye lot, which may or may not end up being a big deal. At this point, I completely lost my mojo and decided to frog it.

Is that the end of the story? Nope. A frogged knitting project, while not something I often write about, is not a failure by any means. I learned a lot on this sweater! I now have a bust shaping technique for top down sweaters that works! And I like the results! I also learned that if I have to do shaping on a field of stockinette, I should use a darker colour. Granted, blocking would have helped, but while blocking is magic, it doesn’t remedy everything. I also learned that my reality is that I overheat easily, and pullovers aren’t my thing. I do have a few pullover patterns in my Ravelry queue, but most of the ones I’m likely to knit can be modified using a steek, and voila, I’ll have an awesome cardigan!

Also, this yarn isn’t going into my stash, to be forgotten until I eventually find something to knit with it. Once I’ve gotten all of the kinks out of it, I’ll be knitting Caramel, which is a free pattern, and will be amazing in Capra. I guess buying too much of the wine colour was a lucky accident. It’s also a very forgiving sweater, because it’s draped, so no bust shaping!

As for the Snowflake pattern, if anyone I know produces offspring and I feel the desire to knit for the little one, I’ll reach for this pattern. I’m also really interested in modifying the yoke to make it a cardigan…Just give me some time, okay?